:: Volume 19, Issue 69 (2022) ::
2022, 19(69): 65-82 Back to browse issues page
The Application of the Yemen Revolutionary Developments of 2011 Based on the Theory of Chalmers, Johnson
Rahim Pakzad * 1, Mostafa Rostami2 , Mohammad Javad Harati2
1- Bu Ali Sina University , rahimpakzad@gmail.com
2- Bu Ali Sina University
Abstract:   (1229 Views)
The Middle East region experienced various revolutions and protests after the 2011 Tunisian revolution. The country of Yemen is one of these cases that experienced the phenomenon of revolution to some extent during the revolutions of Islamic countries. Yemen has a strategic position for the Islamic Republic of Iran due to its  geopolitic location and its large population of Shiites. In order to analyze and understand the Yemeni revolution more, it is necessary to deal with the events of 2011 in that country from the perspective of different theories. This research, with descriptive-analytical method and using library resources, seeks to answer the question: To what extent are the contexts and factors of the 2011 Yemeni revolution compatible with Chalmers Johnson's theory? The main hypothesis of this research is based on the fact that Chalmers Johnson's theory can help to understand some of the revolutionary factors of 2011 in Yemen. The findings of the research show that out of the three factors of the revolution from Johnson's point of view, only two factors, imbalance and acceleration-producing factors, are applicable to the revolutionary developments in Yemen.
 
Keywords: Revolution, Yemen, Islamic Awakening, Revolutionary Transformation, Chalmers Johnson.
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Type of Study: Research |


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Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
Rights and permissions
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
Volume 19, Issue 69 (2022) Back to browse issues page